Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Subway Riders

Subway Riders
30" x 40"     2014     oil on linen

Subway Riders is finished, framed, and now at the Adelson Galleries in New York. This painting - and Mr. Epps - will be in the inaugural exhibition celebrating the gallery's new location at the Crown Building, 730 Fifth Avenue. The opening reception is next Tuesday, May 20th, 5:30 to 8. 

As I worked on this painting, it quickly became an exploration in complementary colors, starting with the bright green and red of the woman's jacket and blouse. Those colors are counterpointed by the complementary yellows and blues of the men's jackets on either side of her; this is then set against the complements of the muted blues and yellows that echo in the background. Meanwhile the dark notes hopefully work to keep the eye moving.

6 comments:

  1. Three pairs of complementary colors radiating like the layers of an onion. Beautiful.

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  2. The emphasis on complementary colors is so van Gogh-esque! I especially love the reflections in the windows. So much to look at in this wonderful composition. Congrats on being shown at Adelson New York's new opening!

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  3. Thanks, Allison! Thanks to Anonymous too! All much appreciated!

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  4. Thanks for providing this fascinating peek into your process and the whys...

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  5. I really like Subway Riders. It's like a symphonic rendition of color. -Jeff

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  6. Subway Riders is a fascinating work; seeming so simple yet deceptively complex and wonderfully compelling. Are the riders alone or together? Like carved figures on a sepulcher (is the subway their tomb?), they are side by side yet forever apart. Their faces stoic, reserved (blank even), betraying no emotion, careful not to engage. Their arms folded to protect themselves against the outside world. It speaks to modern sensibilities, societal alienation, the abandonment of intimacy. A triumph, Andrew.
    Gerry

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"There is more power in telling little than in telling all."
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